Titles and abstracts for Leeds Workshop (December 17th 2014)

Donnchadh O’Conaill (Leeds)

Temporal Modes of Presentation

There are two main theories of how it is possible to have direct experience of temporally extended events or processes. On the Extensional Theory, in order to have experience of extended events our experiences must themselves be extended through time. Barry Dainton has developed this into the Overlap Theory, where successive extended experiences are related to each other by sharing parts. The second theory, Intentionalism, explains the experience of extended events by appeal to temporal modes of presentation under which an event can be experienced (as ‘occurring now’, as ‘having just happened’, etc). I shall argue these two theories need not be opposed in the way that proponents of each have assumed. The Extensional Theory can incorporate temporal modes of presentation, and Intentionalism can allow that successive experiences overlap. The result is a hybrid account of time-consciousness which promises to inherit the strengths of both the Overlap Theory and Intentionalism.

Helen Yetter-Chappell (York)

Leaving it Open: From Sparse Experiences to Sparse Reality

I argue that both experiences [perceptual and mental imagery] and reality can be a great deal more sparse than you might initially believe. There can be experiences that are determinately phenomenally warm-colored, but not any particular warm shade; there can be experiences of objects standing in spatial relations to one another, but not any particular spatial relations; there can be experiences of triangles that are neither equilateral, isosceles, nor scalene, for the relationships between the lengths of sides and angles are left open. Further, for each such “sparse” experience, there is a corresponding possible world. There are possible worlds in which objects stand in spatial relations to one another, but not any particular spatial relations – e.g. in which one object is determinately above another, but where their horizontal positions are left open. There are possible worlds in which there are triangles that are neither equilateral, isosceles, nor scalene.

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